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Fun Spots to Visit in Westchester County, New York, by Steven Wengrover, MD April 23, 2013

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Fun Spots to Visit in Westchester County, New York, by Steven Wengrover, MD

Ideally situated just outside of New York City in the southern Hudson Valley, Westchester County plays host to some of the most enjoyable family fun spots in the region. In one direction is the excitement and hustle and bustle of one of the greatest cities on the planet; in the other are mountains, rivers, and other natural wonders. But you don’t have to go far to have fun, and I’d like to share some perennial favorites right here in Westchester.

New York is one of the original 13 colonies, and it should come as no surprise that Westchester is home to some famous Revolutionary-era sites. White Plains was the northernmost spot the British army traveled before winter set in and drove its troops to look for quarters. The Battle of White Plains took place at Battle Park and Chatterton Hill on October 28, 1776. Though now located in a residential neighborhood, the spot is marked by a commemorative plaque. Also in connection with this battle is the Elijah Miller House, which served as George Washington’s headquarters during the Battle of White Plains. Other sites bound to draw history buffs include Philipsburg Manor in Sleepy Hollow, Thomas Paine Cottage in New Rochelle, and Van Cortlandt Manor in Croton-on-Hudson.

Sure to impress adults and kids alike are the several castles that adorn the Westchester landscape. Located on Westchester’s highest point, Castle on the Hudson is an authentic turn-of-the-century Norman-style castle. Completed in 1910, it was sold in 1941 for $45,000 and is now an upscale hotel and venue for special occasions. Other must-see castles include the 65-room Kykuit mansion completed in 1913 for the Rockefellers; the 6-story, 84-room granite Reid Castle at Manhattanville College, the first home in Westchester wired for electricity and telephone; and the neo-Tudor Westlands building on the campus of Sarah Lawrence College.

Finally, if you really want to feel like you’re getting away but don’t want to drive all the way to Bear Mountain or Harriman State Parks (both within 50 miles), you can breathe in the clean air and pick up some fresh produce at one of the many farms that dot the countryside of Westchester. Supporters of community-based agriculture will revel in the educational programs at Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture. Whether you want to eat farm-fresh food in the restaurant, take cooking classes, or participate in a how-to workshop, Stone Barns Center will educate you and satisfy your palate at the same time. Or, if you’d prefer to pick your own vegetables and have a picnic, make your way to the 187-acre Hilltop Hanover Farm and Environmental Center, and don’t forget to visit the nearby 400-year-old forest.

For more information about things to do in Westchester County, visit http://www.tourism.westchestergov.com.

About the Author: Certified radiologist and authority on medical imaging techniques Steven Wengrover, MD, is a lifelong resident of New York State, mostly in Westchester County. Having raised three children, Dr. Wengrover appreciates the many family-friendly locations in the area.

The American College of Radiology February 5, 2013

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Active since 1923, the American College of Radiology currently serves 34,000 members engaged in radiology-related research and medical care.

The American College of Radiology’s Career Center serves as a premier online recruitment and jobseeker resource. http://bit.ly/qxvSbh

The American College of Radiology recently launched its Dose Index Registry, allowing medical facilities to compare CT exam dose info.

Visit the American College of Radiology’s Education Center for information on a $1,000 discount for military and government radiologists.

The American College of Radiology is currently seeking nominations for 2012 ACR Gold Medalists and Honorary Fellows. http://bit.ly/8jV53N

The American College of Radiology opposes medical imaging cuts in the Proposed Medicare Fee Schedule Rule for 2012.

American College of Radiology members presented their ideas for improving computed tomography (CT) at a recent summit. http://bit.ly/rlwsox

A member of the American College of Radiology, radiologist Dr. Steven Wengrover earned his MD from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Certified by the American Board of Radiology, Dr. Steven Wengrover maintains membership in the American College of Radiology.

From 1984 to 2002, American College of Radiology member Dr. Steven Wengrover ran his own radiology office, Advanced Medical Imaging, P.C.

A talented radiologist with an unblemished record, Dr. Steven Wengrover benefits from membership in the American College of Radiology.

Sven-Ivar Seldinger’s Invaluable Contribution to Cardiovascular Radiology by Steven Wengrover, M.D. January 14, 2013

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In 1952, Swedish radiologist Sven-Ivar Seldinger was a newly practicing radiologist at Stockholm’s Karolinska Institute. While working at the medical university, the doctor devised one of today’s cornerstones in radiology diagnostics. The catheterization procedure was referred to as the Seldinger technique for years; its use has become so standard, Seldinger’s name is rarely connected to it in medial discussions.

Up until Seldinger’s discovery, radiologists throughout the world had no method that was as low-risk and effective for cardio arteriography, or capturing an image of the heart’s vascular system. In fact, before Seldinger unlocked the puzzle, many procedures common today were high-risk or impossible. The access technique is described as follows: a hollow needle is inserted into a blood vessel and a guide wire pushed through it. The needle is removed and a catheter is placed over the wire, which is subsequently removed. The catheter can then be guided through the vascular “roadway”.

Steven Wengrover, M.D. is a specialist in diagnostic radiology based in New York. A graduate of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Dr. Wengrover has practiced medicine for over thirty years.

A Brief History of Yeshiva University, by Steven Wengrover, MD September 24, 2012

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Emerging from the distinct communities of Jews fleeing the repressive anti-Semitic policies of the Russian Empire, Yeshiva University traces its origins back to the late 19th century. Many Jews coming to the United States from Russia and Eastern Europe settled in the Lower East Side of Manhattan. To preserve their heritage, some of the immigrants opened Etz Chaim, a small Jewish school set up to provide Jewish boys with religious instruction as well as a solid secular education in fulfillment of state requirements.

The school’s popularity grew, and more and more people expressed a desire to establish an institute for advanced Jewish studies. In 1897, the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, named after Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Spektor of Lithuania, graduated its first class of students, who had come from Etz Chaim. Often switching locations, the new school eventually became the first yeshiva (an institute for higher Talmudic studies) in North America based on the Eastern European model.

In its 117-year history, Yeshiva University has had only four presidents, each with a unique vision but all contributing to the continued expansion of the institute’s programs, activities, and projects. While retaining its obvious ties to Judaism, Yeshiva University is an internationally known institute that produces quality research in many areas of science, medicine, and the humanities and involves itself in the broader community.

Special mention should be made of one of the crown jewels of Yeshiva University’s schools: the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Established in 1955, the year of its namesake’s death, the college quickly emerged as a world-renowned center of medical research and education. Albert Einstein College of Medicine receives funding from the National Institutes of Health to conduct biomedical research, publishes its own scientific journals, and participates in global efforts to combat HIV/AIDS. The college is nonsectarian and welcomes students without regard for race, creed, or ethnic background.

About the Author: Dr. Steven Wengrover earned his Doctor of Medicine from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University in New York City in 1979. A specialist in diagnostic radiology and internal medicine, Dr. Wengrover has worked in various hospitals, clinics, and private practice over the course of his 30-year career. Dr. Steven Wengrover received his certification from the American College of Radiology.

Dr. Steven Wengrover on Interventional Radiology September 5, 2012

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As a physician with more than 30 years of professional and residency experience in diagnostic radiology, I maintain general expertise in the many facets of this medical specialty, including the subspecialty known as interventional radiology (IR). Also known as vascular and interventional radiology (VIR), IR allows physicians to perform minimally invasive medical procedures guided by images. The imaging techniques used in IR can serve either as diagnostic tools or for treatment purposes. The radiologist uses these images as guides for directing the movement of instruments, such as catheters and needles, through the blood vessels or other natural pathways to damaged or diseased parts of the body. IR procedures employ conventional imaging methods, such as X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and computed tomography (CT).

Doctors generally employ IR to determine or assist in the most minimally invasive treatment processes possible. IR techniques offer a range of benefits to patients. By limiting the bodily trauma that occurs during the procedure and by treating the patient through the skin, IR treatments often result in lower risks of infection and faster recovery times. Most IR procedures cost less than traditional surgery because they are performed on an outpatient basis or require only a short hospital stay. In addition, patients who receive IR treatments typically experience lower risks of complication and pain.

Dr. Steven Wengrover attended the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. He is board certified by The American Board of Radiology and a member of the American College of Radiology. Dr. Wengrover has practiced medicine for over 30 years.

Dr. Steven Wengrover on Summer in the Westchester County Department of Parks, Recreation and Conservation August 1, 2012

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Dr. Steven Wengrover is a radiologist who resides in Westchester County, New York. Westchester County is consistently rated one of the best places in the U.S. to raise a family. One reason our area is so wonderful for children is the excellent park district. The Westchester Park District has opened registration for its 2012 summer camps, and this year’s lineup has something for every child.

Science-loving children will thrive in the Ecology Camps. The camps for younger children focus on nature study, while the Junior High camp includes survival skills, a ropes course, and wildlife management training. Parents may set up additional child care that follows the camp session.

Musicians can hone their orchestral skills at Music Camp, while sports lovers can participate in Volleyball, Basketball, and Golf Camps.

Are you a locavore? Then your kids might enjoy the Young Farmers Camp. This weeklong day camp lets children experience life on a farm at the turn of the 20th century. After a week of working in the garden, collecting eggs, and maintaining farm equipment, kids will understand how food gets to the supermarket.

These popular programs fill up fast, so contact the Westchester County Department of Parks, Recreation and Conservation today and give your kids a chance to learn and grow over the summer.

A Brief History of Computed Tomography (CT) Imaging by Steven Wengrover, M.D. July 26, 2012

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Dr. Steven Wengrover is an experienced radiologist located in the New York area. In this article, he describes the history of one of the most common types of radiologic procedures, computed tomography imaging, more commonly known as a CT scan.

The technique of computed tomography was developed in the early 1970s by British engineer Godfrey Hounsfield. South African physicist Allan Cormack conducted his own research along similar avenues Hounsfield and Cormack won the 1979 Nobel Peace Prize for Medicine.

Originally, CT scans focused on the head only, but within a few years systems had been developed to image the entire body. The technique came into widespread use approximately a decade after its development and there are now over 30,000 CT scanners in use worldwide.

CT scan technology has improved significantly since its invention. The original CT scanner required several hours to process the data from a single exposure and several days to create an image. Today, CT scanners do this same task in under a second.

As CT scanners have gotten faster; they have also gotten more accurate. The faster the scan is completed, the less chance artifacts or “noise” is added by the movement of the patient. These faster scans also use much lower doses of radiation.

The way a CT scan works is by taking a large number of two dimension pictures rotating around a central axis. Subsequently, the computer connects the gaps between successive pictures in order to create a smooth, three-dimensional model. Some of the most common uses of CT scans include the detection of tumors, hemorrhages, and bone fractures.

Below is a video of a CT scan in process:

Nuclear Medicine: An Interview with Steven Wengrover November 16, 2011

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Steven Wengrover, MD, graduated from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University in New York City. Dr. Wengrover is certified by the American College of Radiology and specializes in various areas of nuclear medicine, such as diagnostic radiology, cardiovascular radiology, and radiation oncology. Dr. Wengrover possesses almost 30 years of professional experience as a radiologist in both private practice and at a number of hospitals and clinics. We sat down with Steven Wengrover to talk about nuclear medicine, its safety, and its importance in modern medicine.

Q: What is meant by the term “nuclear medicine”? What does that encompass?

A: Nuclear medicine refers to the use of radioactive matter to take images of the body and treat diseases. It considers both the functioning (physiology) and structure (anatomy) of the body to diagnose illness and formulate a course of action.

Q: What are the different ways the body is imaged using nuclear technology?

A: Several different imaging techniques are used, each suitable in particular circumstances. These include positron emission tomography (which many people know as the PET scan), computed tomography, cardiovascular imaging, and bone scanning. What all these techniques have in common is that they use radioactive substances in image creation. They are used to detect blood ailments, tumors, and aneurysms, for example.

Q: Many people become nervous at any mention of “nuclear radiation.” Is nuclear medicine safe?

A: Yes, and I’ll explain why. First, the standard in nuclear medicine is to expose the patient to as little radiation as is necessary to obtain an image. Second, this low level of exposure is actually much less than the normal amounts of radiation we’re all exposed to every day. Many people are not aware of the fact that background radiation from rocks, soil, and space, not to mention our own bodies, is a normal and constant presence in our lives. If you add in the radiation we get from color television sets, household smoke alarms, and digital clocks, then that’s much more exposure to radiation than you’ll ever get from imaging in a nuclear medicine procedure.

Q: What would modern medicine look like today without nuclear medicine?

A: Diagnosis and treatment without nuclear imaging techniques is simply unimaginable in the case of many ailments today. In addition to providing noninvasive methods of evaluating patients, nuclear imaging is the most cost-effective way to determine what’s going on in someone’s body. The price of the alternatives to nuclear imaging would put diagnosis and treatment out of the reach of many people. To be sure, no single treatment or diagnostic method is suitable in all cases, but the advantages of nuclear imaging are so great that it has become a permanent feature of modern medicine.

A Brief History of Yeshiva University October 26, 2011

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by Steven Wengrover, MD

Emerging from the distinct communities of Jews fleeing the repressive anti-Semitic policies of the Russian Empire, Yeshiva University traces its origins back to the late 19th century. Many Jews coming to the United States from Russia and Eastern Europe settled in the Lower East Side of Manhattan. To preserve their heritage, some of the immigrants opened Etz Chaim, a small Jewish school set up to provide Jewish boys with religious instruction as well as a solid secular education in fulfillment of state requirements.

The school’s popularity grew, and more and more people expressed a desire to establish an institute for advanced Jewish studies. In 1897, the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, named after Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Spektor of Lithuania, graduated its first class of students, who had come from Etz Chaim. Often switching locations, the new school eventually became the first yeshiva (an institute for higher Talmudic studies) in North America based on the Eastern European model.

In its 117-year history, Yeshiva University has had only four presidents, each with a unique vision but all contributing to the continued expansion of the institute’s programs, activities, and projects. While retaining its obvious ties to Judaism, Yeshiva University is an internationally known institute that produces quality research in many areas of science, medicine, and the humanities and involves itself in the broader community.

Special mention should be made of one of the crown jewels of Yeshiva University’s schools: the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Established in 1955, the year of its namesake’s death, the college quickly emerged as a world-renowned center of medical research and education. Albert Einstein College of Medicine receives funding from the National Institutes of Health to conduct biomedical research, publishes its own scientific journals, and participates in global efforts to combat HIV/AIDS. The college is nonsectarian and welcomes students without regard for race, creed, or ethnic background.

About the Author: Dr. Steven Wengrover earned his Doctor of Medicine from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University in New York City in 1979. A specialist in diagnostic radiology and internal medicine, Dr. Wengrover has worked in various hospitals, clinics, and private practice over the course of his 30-year career. Dr. Steven Wengrover received his certification from the American College of Radiology.

Dr. Steven Wengrover on Interventional Radiology Procedures August 3, 2011

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by Dr. Steven Wengrover

Pioneered during the first half of the 20th century, interventional radiology, or IR, today serves as a safer and less expensive alternative to traditional surgeries. A subspecialty in the field of radiology, IR employs imaging technology to determine the best approach for or assist in minimally invasive treatments. By using imagery of the patient’s body, physicians may direct needles, catheters, or similar instruments through the blood vessels or other internal paths to a diseased organ or area and target treatment at the source. Doctors commonly use a number of different IR procedures to treat patients less invasively.

One such IR treatment, angioplasty, involves delivering a guide wire through a closed or obstructed blood vessel and mechanically widening the vessel by inflating a balloon attached to the wire. Considered safer than bypass surgery, an angioplasty requires imagery of the blood vessels both to identify the problem artery and to send the balloon catheter to the proper location.

The nonsurgical IR procedure known as embolization involves selectively blocking off vessels to prevent blood from flowing to certain areas. Commonly used to shrink tumors and aneurysms by limiting their blood supplies, embolization requires sending a guide wire or catheter through the correct artery or vein to the affected region. During the procedure, radiologists employ imagery techniques to establish a guide map to the proper internal location.

One type of embolization, chemoembolization, represents an exciting, relatively new way of treating cancer. Chemoembolization delivers anticancer medications directly into an internal tumor. The procedure requires physicians to identify the blood vessel or vessels feeding the cancerous growth. As the drugs attack the cancer, a blocking agent shuts off the feeding vessels, allowing the drugs to remain in contact with the tumor for a longer time in a more concentrated dosage. Other common IR treatments include cryoablation, which freezes tissue; endovenous laser treatment for varicose veins; thrombolysis for blood clots; and radiofrequency ablation, which destroys tissue with heat.

Dr. Steven Wengrover, a graduate of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, has practiced medicine for over 30 years. In addition to his distinguished career, Dr. Wengrover is devoted to his wife and three children.

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